Types of Prejudice

Ambivalent Prejudice

A form of prejudice in which people have a mixture of positive and negative beliefs about and feelings toward an outgroup, resulting in ambivalent attitudes towards members of that group.

Aversive Prejudice

A form of prejudice in which people feel uncomfortable with interacting with members of minority groups and so try to ignore their existence and avoid contact with them, although they try to be polite and correct when they do have contact with members of minority groups.

Benevolent Prejudice

A form of prejudice that is expressed in terms of apparently positive beliefs and emotional responses to targets of prejudice. This prejudice often manifests as chivalrous acts towards women.

Hostile Prejudice

A traditional form of prejudice expressed in terms of negative beliefs about and emotional responses to targets of prejudice.

Modern Symbolic Prejudice

A form of prejudice that avoids blatant derogation of outgroups. This prejudice is rooted in abstractions, such as cultural stereotypes of outgroups, rather than people’s direct experiences with members of those groups.

Source: Whitley, B. E. Jr. & Kite, M. E (2010). The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth